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Memories...Do Not Open is The Chainsmokers' debut studio album that was released on April 7, 2017 by Disruptor Records and Columbia Records.

TracklistingEdit

  1. The One 2:57
  2. Break Up Every Night 3:27
  3. Bloodstream 3:44
  4. Don't Say (featuring Emily Warren) 3:48
  5. Something Just Like This (with Coldplay) 4:07
  6. My Type (featuring Emily Warren) 3:37
  7. It Won't Kill Ya (featuring Louane) 3:37
  8. Paris 3:41
  9. Honest 3:28
  10. Wake Up Alone (featuring Jhené Aiko) 3:35
  11. Young 3:44
  12. Last Day Alive (featuring Florida Georgia Line) 3:34

Album BackgroundEdit

Chris Martin of Coldplay had first tweeted about the album, prompting the Chainsmokers to confirm it

The album was revealed during an on-screen Grammy red carpet interview with the duo that their album title was to be named "Memories...Do Not Open" and it would be released on April 7, just before they embark on the tour of the same name.

As seen in the interview, Taggart was hesitant after revealing the release date of the album, before asking Pall if he should say it.

Taggart said, "We're ready. We've got a full album; it's going to be amazing. It's coming out April 7, was I supposed to say that?" before Pall responded, "No, but it's alright."

Chart PerformanceEdit

"Memories...Do Not Open" debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 with 221,000 album-equivalent units, of which 166,000 were pure album sales.

As of August 25, 2017, the album has moved 1,000,000 album-equivalent units in the United States.

Critical ReceptionEdit

At Metacritic, the album received an average score of 43, based on eight reviews, indicating "mixed or average reviews."

Damien Morris of The Observer gave a two-out-of-five star review, describing the group's music as, "instantly memorable yet completely forgettable", comparing the album to US President Donald Trump, "shallow, always betraying its influences, with a third-grade vocabulary and ambition that runs no further than emptying the nearest wallet."

In Entertainment Weekly, Barry Walters highlighted the duo's commercial success, describing their style as, "smoothed-out, mid-tempo, nearly easy-listening formula", but opined it sounds, "as if you're playing the radio instead of one solitary album".

Walters considered "Break Up Every Night" as the only dance cut, while "the other cuts are basically ballads with beats — modernized Moby without the soul-searching or gospel samples."

Sal Cinquemani from Slant Magazine gave the album two stars out of five, criticizing Taggart's lack of personality and vocal ability.

Additionally, Cinquemani stated, "the downside to the wild success of that approach is that Taggart and Pall have been forced to discover their creative voices in front of the whole world. And unfortunately, the sound they've settled on is parked firmly in the middle of the road."

On AllMusic, Neil Young also gave a two-out-of-five star review, calling Memories...Do Not Open a, "calculated dose of millennial escapism that peddles the same sounds as their far more engaging EP work."

Maeve McDermott of USA Today questioned, "is this the worst album of 2017?", calling Taggart's vocals "hilariously bad".

Philip Sherburne of Pitchfork claimed that, "The debut album from the celebrity production duo is a somber departure from their EDM days—a lifeless, anodyne pop record that wallows in basic feelings of regret and narcissism."

Along with comparing the album to 2014 single "#SELFIE", Sherburne wrote, "None of it sounds anything like '#SELFIE,' but its worldview is barely any bigger than that song's narrow perspective".

Jon Caramanica from The New York Times called the album a "savvy success that cannily toys with expectations" with its songs veering from the "usual gut punch" approach for its drops, but felt that the record is a "meaningless concept" in the "big-festival dance music" where the duo thrived in.

He also commented on Taggart's "capable but unexciting" vocal performance and his "shockingly" few lyrical ideas, with most of the album's songs "[moaning] about brittle young relationships".

Jordan Sargent of Spin observed the monotony of the record, stating: "The Chainsmokers have one song, and if you don’t want to hear 12 versions of it, please do not un-click the latch holding this box closed."

He noted Taggart's "unique" vocal accessibility for listeners, but felt that his charm dissipated as the album wears on which resulted in a "series of songs that bleed endlessly into each other."

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